Côte De Boeuf with Béarnaise and Chips

  • Time: 1 hour
  • Serves: 2
  • Level: medium

Mr WDC
A côte de boeuf is a basically a monster steak with a bone in, or a French version of a rib of beef. But however you want to describe it, it is a wonderful piece of beef. Cook it simply and serve with chips and salad - and my no-split, light and easy béarnaise sauce.

What you need

650g – 750g côte de boeuf

For the béarnaise

1/2 large banana shallot – about 6tbs chopped

6 tbs white wine vinegar

Roughly ground black pepper

Small bunch tarragon

2 tbs butter

1 tbs chopped tarragon leaves

200ml creme fraiche

2 tbs mayonnaise

1/2 tsp corn flour

Salt

500g potatoes – suitable for chips, such as Maris Piper

To serve

Green salad

 



How Dad Cooked It

  1. Make the béarnaise. Chop the shallot into a fine dice. Add the vinegar, the black pepper and bunch of tarragon. Heat on a low temperature for 15 minutes – the aim is to reduce the vinegar to 1 tablespoon, increase the heat (or add more water) as necessary. Strain the liquid pressing to extract liquid from the shallots. Reserve a spoonful of the shallots (see below). In another pan heat the butter and add the chopped tarragon. Cook the tarragon and butter on low heat for a minute. Take off the heat and stir in the creme fraiche add the mayonnaise and then the vinegar. Take a tablespoon of this mixture and whisk in the corn flour in a separate bowl, then return the corn flour mixture to the pan. Heat gently until just beginning to bubble whisking all the time. Season and take off the heat and keep warm. I like to add a spoon of shallots to the sauce, it gives a bit of welcome texture, plus some extra piquancy to offset the richness of the meat.
  2. Prepare the potatoes. Peel and cut into chip shapes of your choice. Rinse and soak in water for 15 minutes. Then dry on tea towels for 15 minutes or longer. Cook in a deep fat fryer or large pan with oil at 165C until soft but not browned. Drain.
  3. Prepare the beef. Take the joint from the fridge, unwrap the beef (I rinse quickly and dry with kitchen towels) let it rest for half an hour to come to room temperature and to air. Preheat the oven to 180C, gas mark 4.
  4. Cook the beef. Heat an oven-proof pan on medium high heat until hot. Add a couple of tablespoons of light vegetable oil, put the meat in the pan and sear on all sides until evenly browned. Lift the meat from the pan and drain the hot oil into a heatproof container (discard the oil when cool). Return the meat to the pan and place in the oven and cook for 10 minutes. Take the meat from the oven and season, then turn over and season again, return to the oven and cook for another 10 minutes or until cooked to your liking. Using a temperature probe, aim for about 48C in the deepest part of the steak for rare (this should rise to about 52C after resting). Consult your probe’s recommendations for medium-rare and well-done, or cut into the beef to judge. Remove from the oven. Place the joint on a warm plate and cover with tin foil. Let the meat rest for 15 minutes. If desired, the pan can be de-glazed with a little stock, wine or water, the resulting liquid can be used as a sauce or added to the juices from the sliced beef.
  5. Finish the chips. Whilst the meat is resting cook the chips. Heat the oil in the deep-frying pan to 185C and add the chips. Cook until browned and tender.
  6. Serve. Slice the steak straight down across the joint. (Strictly speaking, this is cutting with the grain rather than against the grain, as is usually advised – however the beef should be so tender that this technicality is unimportant.) Serve with the sauce and a green salad.
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